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Types of Amplification


Receiver In The Ear (RITE) or Receiver in the Canal (RIC)

Housed in a tiny case that hides neatly behind the ear and attached to a discrete wire that transfers the sound to the ear canal.

Advantages:

  • Can provide the most normal sound quality
  • Less maintenance
  • Appropriate for patients with high pitched hearing loss and can naturally reduce background noise
  • Cosmetically appealing
  • Enhances sound localization (knowing where sound is coming from)

Disadvantages:

  • Can be difficult to manipulate for patients with poor dexterity

 

 

 

 

 

 

Traditional Behind The Ear (BTE)

Housed in a case that fits behind the ear.  A tube connects the hearing aid with a custom made earmold in the ear which delivers the sound into the ear canal.

Advantages:

  • Large battery, which leads to long battery life
  • Appropriate for severe hearing loss

Disadvantages:

  • More visible than smaller models

 

 

 

 

In The Canal (ITC) and In the Ear (ITE)

Custom fit hearing aids that are larger than CIC hearing aids and can have more features because of the larger size.

Advantages:

  • Easier to insert and manipulate for people with dexterity problems

 

Disadvantages:

  • More visible than smaller models
  • Difficult to localize sound (identify where sounds are coming from)

 

 

Completely In the Canal (CIC) or Invisible In the Canal (IIC)

Aid are custom made to fit completely in the patient’s ear canal and out of site. These hearing aids can be inserted and removed daily by the patient.

Advantages:

  • Cosmetically appealing
  • Less power to overcome hearing loss and enhancement of high pitches due to the proximity to the ear drum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Disadvantages:

  • Not appropriate for severe hearing loss
  • Small size makes it difficult to manipulate therefore not appropriate for patients with dexterity issues
  • Smaller battery= Less battery life
  • Can create a “plugged feeling” (occlusion) in some people
  • Limited programmable features which can result in difficulties in noise
  • Difficult to localize sound (identify where sounds are coming from)



Starter Hearing Aid (The AMP hearing device)

For people with a mild hearing loss who are not ready for a hearing aid.

Advantages:

  • Appropriate for part time use or short term use
  • Invisible
  • Affordable

Disadvantages:

  • Very limited technology
  • Not appropriate for long term use

 

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